A Bit About The Spoon Theory (And How I’m Practicing It)

Not long ago, I shared a generic daily checklist with you, here on my blog.

It was something I put a great amount of effort into, but at the end of the day, it held too many options.

Sure, it was nice seeing all of the daily possibilities in one place, but I have nowhere near the energy it takes to fill up that checklist!

So, I started looking more into the Spoon Theory, that Ashley from Mental Health @ Home has shared with all of us.

Turns out, not only was I basically reinventing the wheel with my daily checklist, I was being ineffective in getting the most important things done!

The Spoon Theory isolates those things that are most important and gives them a ranking system, allowing for you to choose where you spend your energy, day in and day out.

It just keeps things simple, which I like very much.

The originator of the Spoon Theory created it for herself some time ago, to share with friends and family, how she deals with lupus.

She once said, that the Spoon Theory is for anyone battling an illness, and severe mental illness would definitely fit into that category.

In the spirit of sharing more of my day to day with my readers, I am including a snapshot of my spoons.

Thus, I hope others can find inspiration on the Spoon Theory. And, a quick google search regarding Spoon Theory will tell you all you need to know to get started.

For reference purposes, I have been trying to allot myself 15 spoons every day. And, many days I work with that or a little bit less.

I am interested to know. Who all out there is practicing the Spoon Theory (or any variation of such)? And, what have you found is a good number of spoons to deal with, for your situation?

9 Comments

  1. I like this system!

    I don’t usually count spoons, but I pay attention when I start getting close (or may get close) to my daily spoon availability. I know appointments are high in spoon requirements, so I don’t plan anything else with high spoon requirements that day. I’m most productive in the morning, and by the time I reach the afternoon, I’ll only try to do tasks that fit with whatever resources I’ve still got available.

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    1. I don’t know how much you know about spoon theory, but in a nutshell… I get 15 spoons per day and that equates to my day’s energy. And so, it’s up to me to plan for how I use this allotted energy or “spoons,” to get things done. The number 15 is a guess at how I do in general with the kinds of tasks I’ve listed. The concept is revolutionary for those battling chronic illnesses!

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