Something In-Depth Regarding Schizophrenia I’ve Never Written About

I’ve been thinking about bringing up this subject for some time, and now it’s coming to fruition.

There are many people with a schizophrenia diagnosis who are stuck in a world of delusion/hallucination.

And, what I mean by that, is that they, through no fault of their own, experience an alternate reality—one that is different from the rest of us.

This has much to do with their not consistently taking an antipsychotic drug.

Antipsychotics help to keep one from going through this alternate reality I speak of.

If I were able to wave a magic wand and do so in a loving and helpful fashion, I would do so in the direction of those who both need a schizophrenia diagnosis and antipsychotic medication.

For whatever reason, my delusions/hallucinations do not exacerbate my reality, as much as many other people going through schizophrenia.

Thus, it is not all that unusual to be knee deep in this stuff, and not realize you’re hallucinating or experiencing a delusion.

Again, it is my sincere hope that someone, somewhere is able to get help to individuals who may need to be on some appropriate medication, for their symptoms.

It isn’t fun being in an alternate reality, and chances are pretty good people experiencing these types of symptoms, aren’t even aware of them… until they have an all-out psychotic break.

And even then, there is a strong lack of awareness aka a lot of denial going on.

11 Comments

    1. Yes. I know I walked around my old college campus, after my initial psychotic breaks, unaware and lacking insight as to the potential severity of my situation. In retrospect, it was no surprise that I had subsequent breaks 3/4 way through school.

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  1. From what I’ve learnt in psychology, schizophrenia is one of the hardest mental illnesses to prescribe medications for but it’s also one where medication is vital for the majority of patients. I truly hope those that are experiencing symptoms are able to get the medications they need and I also hope that more research is done about the illness so they can get better medications that suit everyone since a large number of patients suffer side effects since a lot of medications for schizophrenia are quite strong.

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    1. You understand the gamut of things with regards to schizophrenia quite well!

      It’s a difficult illness to have and to treat, but my hope is that things do improve across the board. With stigma and treatments and more potential for recovery.

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      1. Yeah I learn schizophrenia in detail in particular because that’s what I was assigned for my presentation.

        I really hope so. And there is quite a bit of research being done about schizophrenia which could really help patients.

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      2. Yes. I read an interview with the guy who has worked his whole career and studied the past 200 years of mental illness and how we handle it. It would seem that a lot of the medications are not as good as one might expect. According to this guy who seems to have worked 40 years in trying to make things better for people with mental illness. He has also just released a book. https://www.latimes.com/california/story/2022-05-10/q-a-andrew-scull-severe-mental-illness

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      3. Oh wow, that’s interesting. I am not familiar with him but I have learnt that mental health medications are not as good as physical health ones. And the illnesses that are less common in particular still have a long way to go with some of the medications.

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  2. Psychotic breaks are no joke. While on the psychiatric ward I was given thorazine. I was advised to stay on it after release but after I stopped all my addictive substances I made a decision to deal with it without medication. They said I had mild schizophrenia due to drug use. For me….I can’t do meds, but I don’t advocate that for anyone but me.

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