Four Ideas That I Find Helpful, Part One

A schedule / checklist / to do list / etc.

I’ve written about this before, but awhile back, I was on “the Mighty” (a mental health site, that I am 50/50 on whether I still like).

There, I interact with several people with mental illnesses, asking questions and responding in kind.

One day, I think I asked a variant of the question, “what has been the most important component to your successfully managing severe mental illness?”

Of all the responses I got, I enjoyed the one that highlighted having a schedule!

For me, I already know that I can’t just summon up the energy required to experience a full day of activity.

I just cannot!

So, a few months ago, I said to myself, “What can I do?”

And, that started my working on all the things in a day, that I would love to do if the energy was there.

Hence, the schedule!

It is still evolving and right now it is a checklist of things I can do in and around my home, and I found that just having these items somewhere accessible (whether I got to them or not), has proven helpful to me!

In order for me to even do a third of the items (and have the energy to follow through), I need to sleep 8-9 hours… first and period!

Restful sleep is so very important!!!

What sorts of things do you do daily, that make you feel better?

Redefining “Good” Again

Let’s poll the experts—the people living with severe mental illness.

How can I return to a place of “better” functioning? Is it even “possible?” How can I get back to “good?”

I don’t know that I can do that to be honest!

For me, it’s about highlighting what I can do! It’s about finding what works for me, and expanding upon that!

And, for the record, I believe we can learn from everyone (as everybody has something to teach us).

Just today, I think I learned something of value, regarding my lists: calendars, to-do items, and schedules.

This (at least I am trying it on for size):

I have 1) A CALENDAR for appointments. 2) A TO DO list of projects I sometimes get done in a day (and sometimes not). 3) A SCHEDULE of recurring items that I now break into “easy” and “difficult.”

Now, this approach will only mean something if it’s “implemented,” and if I celebrate my accomplishments along the way!

Is all of this list “completion” just wishful thinking? Can implementing these ideas, help in any way?

When consistency is the problem (and it is my problem), the short answer is, “we’ll see.”

Life is damn difficult, mental illness is even more difficult than that, and no one can live out our journey’s but us!

As always (no matter how cheesy it may sound), I take life one day at a time!

How about you? What kinds of things are you doing to stay on top of your mental health? Especially during COVID?

My Schedule / To Do List

Monday, I wrote a bit about my schedule/to do list.

It helps me to have some amount of organization in my life. And, I can feel that with having lists.

I rarely get everything done, and am working to feel better about that, but it’s very difficult! I want to feel good about what I accomplish vs. what I don’t, regardless of why!

I actually write a lot of things down and have numerous writings, all over the place.

Sometimes it helps, other times it doesn’t; and, it usually depends on me and my ability to focus.

Care to share what your schedules and to do lists look like? Or maybe more importantly, how you treat unfinished items on them (i.e. are you truly at peace with not having certain things done, or even everything done)?